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Thread: NTFS Guide

  1. #1
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    NTFS Guide

    [Spoiler="Getting started"]Before starting this guide you need to make sure you have a softmodded wii, this guide is specifically designed to work with a Mauifrog Softmod from here.

    The benefits of NTFS file structure:
    - You can load files larger than 4gb
    - You can share the partition with basically anything
    - You don't need to convert .ISO files

    The downside to NTFS file structure:
    - Homebrew channel apps are not supported meaning you will need to have a fat partition or an sd card
    - Not DIOS MIOS compatible

    Not for you, then the fat32 guide might be what you are looking for[/Spoiler]
    [Spoiler=Important]I don't want anyone asking were to get Iso's of games or anything remotely linked to piracy, the guide is for the purpose of backing up your legally purchased Wii games for storage and play off of a NTFS formatted drive. Anyone who asks will have their post removed and will receive an infraction or possibly even banned! You have been warned.[/Spoiler]
    [SPOILER=Things you will need] 1) A Usb device and it is highly recommended you check out the usb compatibility list

    2) A means of formatting the drive, ie PC, Mac or Linux.

    3) Easeus Partition Manager Home Edition

    4) An sd card formatted to fat32 to run your homebrew apps from, the one u used from the any wii guide will be perfect as it will already have all the required apps on it. [/SPOILER]
    [SPOILER=Chapter 1 - Formatting your Hard drive][SPOILER=Window PC]For the purpose of the guide we will assume that the drive will have to be formatted
    1) Install Easeus Partition Manager Home Edition which you should have already downloaded earlier

    2) Hook your hard drive up to a usb port on your PC and make a note of the drive letter

    3) Run Easeus partition managerYou should now be looking at something like this:
    4) Select your hard drive by the letter you noted earlier and right click on it then select delete and then ok. (Be sure it is the correct drive as it will be deleted!)

    5) Your hard drive should now be showing as unallocated and should look like this:
    6) Right click on your unallocated partition and select create, you should now have these options:* Partition label : Wii - (I always name mine Wii, but it can be named whatever you like)* Create as : Primary* Drive letter : W - (Again I always use W for Wii, but it can be anything you like)* File system : NTFS* Cluster size - (This will be set automatically)

    7) Size and positionIt should automatically be set like this:* Partition size should be whatever the size of the drive is* Unallocated space after should be 0* Click okExample:
    8) Set drive as active* Right click your hard drive* Set active* Click ok

    9) Format* Navigate to the top left corner under the view tab and click apply* Click yes on the pop up window* Several seconds/minutes later you should get a pop up saying the operation has been successful* Click ok and then exit the program, your drive has been formatted. [/SPOILER][SPOILER=Mac OS Formatting]
    NOTE: I tested these steps using Mac OS X 10.6.8. Things may behave differently on Lion or Mountain Lion. Please let us know if you have tried these steps on other versions of Mac OS so we know the full scope of compatibility. I would expect everything to work the same or as otherwise noted.

    1) Downloading the files you need from the following locations:

    2) Prepare the system for non-standard package installs:

    • Launch System Preferences App and select Security & Privacy.
    • Click the lock in the lower-left corner to allow changes to settings and authenticate.
    • Change the setting to "Allow applications downloaded from:" to "Anywhere" and confirm. (If you wish to set this back after the upcoming reboot, you are welcome to do so.)
    • Exit System Preferences.

    3) Installing required packages:
    NOTE: A system will reboot to complete installation. Be sure there are no unsaved data as you will likely lose it. It is recommend that nothing else other than the browser you are reading this from be opened at this time.
    • Launch the OSXFUSE file to mount the disk image. The window that pops up will have three items in it including “Install OSXFUSE 2.5” with the “package” icon. Double click that to launch the installer. On the Custom Install screen, make sure that “MacFUSE Compatibility Layer” is checked. Accept all other default settings and complete the install. Eject the OSXFUSE disk image.
    • Launch the NTFS-3G file to mount the disk image. The window that pops up will have two items in it including “Install NTFS-3G” with the “package” icon. Double click that to launch the installer. You will be asked which type of Caching Mode you want NTFS-3G to run in. Choose “No Caching”. Choosing the other option may result in the loss of data in the event NTFS drives are removed without proper unmounting. When install has completed, reboot the system.
    • If you have Mac OS X 10.6.8 or earlier, jump to item 3, otherwise perform the next step:
      • When the system comes back up, run the fuse_wait-1.1.pkg to launch that installer, there are no options to choose from, so just finish this install to the end.


    4) Formatting the hard drive:
    • Now that everything has been installed, launch Disk Utility (Finder -> Places -> Applications -> Utilities -> Disk Utililty).
    • Mount your USB device to your Mac and note it on the left window showing all known devices.
    • Select the drive in that left window then choose the "Partition" tab in the right window.
    • Press the "-" button below the partition list until you’ve removed all partitions.
    • Choose the "Erase" tab in the right window. Under Format, select "Windows NT File System (NTFS-3G)".
    • Under Name, type in a simple name of your choice (I’ve chosen “WiiHD”). Note that spaces are not allowed in the name field.
    • After the format and name has been selected, click on the “Erase…” button below to start the formatting and confirm.
    • If it worked, great! Continue on to the next section. If it failed the first time, don’t panic (It failed for me, too). Simply repeat the process having selected the newly created partition to the hard drive in the left window (mine was named disk2s2 by default, yours may be something else, depending on how many other devices are mounted), choose “Erase” tab, select the format and name as you did earlier and click “Erase…” again and confirm. This time, after a significantly longer wait, it should work.

    [/SPOILER][spoiler=Linux]Note: To keep things simple, all the instructions are written for Ubuntu which is currently the most popular distribution. If you use another distribution, probably most will stay the same, but some steps (e.g. installing Gparted) might differ.

    Installing Gparted
    Note: if you use another distro, please use that distro's package manager or installation tool to install Gparted.First, we need to install Gparted. To do this, open the Ubuntu software center.Next, enter "Gparted" (without quotes) in the search field of the ubuntu software center.Click on Gparted and next click on the install button.It might happen that Ubuntu ask for a password. Enter the password for your used and click "Authenticate".As soon as your screen looks like this (notice the green tick), Gparted has finished installing and you can close the software center.Using Gparted
    Note: From this point onward, instructions for different distributions will be almost identical.
    Next, click on the ubuntu home lens, enter "Gparted" (again no quotes) in the search field and click on Gparted.Again, it could be Ubuntu ask for your password. Enter it and click "Authenticate".Gparted will start. After that, we first need to select the correct device. The easiest way to do this is by looking at the sizes of the devices. Another method is to label a partition of the device you want to select and look which device has the label you entered. Make absolutely certain you have selected the correct device!After we have selected the correct device, we need to check whether it's partitions are unmounted. If you see a partition with a key next to it like in the picture, you need to unmount first. If you do not see any keys next to any partitions, you can skip the next step.To unmount partitions, simply left click on the partition and click "Unmount". Repeat this for all mounted (those with keys next to it) partitions of the selected device.WARNING: THIS WILL REMOVE ALL THE DATA ON THE DEVICE! After we have made sure all partitions of the device are unmounted, we need to delete all the partitions on it. To do so, left click on a partition a click "Delete" (marked red). Alternatively, you can select a partition and hit the delete button in the top bar (marked blue). Either one will do. Repeat this for all partitions.If you have deleted all partitions, your screen should look similair to this. Note there are no partitions and only unallocated space.Next, left click on the unallocated space and click "New" (marked red). Alternatively, select the unallocated space and click the new button in the top bar (marked blue).A screen will appear to create a partition. Select the right file system (ntfs) by clicking on the list and selecting ntfs.After you have selected the correct file system, click "Add". Make sure it says "ntfs" next to file system!As the final step, hit the green tick in the top bar to apply the operations.Gparted will ask if you are sure that you want to apply the operations. Click "Apply".A screen will appear showing the progress of Gparted. As soon as it is done, you can close Gparted and disconnect the device.[/spoiler][spoiler=Linux alternative using command line]Command Line (NTFS-3G):You'll need to know the name of the disk and partition that you're going to format. Open up your preferred terminal emulator and run the following:
    Code:
    fdisk -l
    A list of disks and their respective partitions will pop up. You're internal hard drive will be listed first and will probably be called “/dev/sda” or “/dev/hda.” After that your external drives will be listed (the first one might be “/dev/sdc”). If more than one external drive is listed, the best way to know which one is the correct one is to remove all devices other than the one you want and re-run the command. You'll also need the partition name which is the disk name followed by a number, usually one (i.e. “/dev/sdc1”). You can find out for sure what it is by looking at the disk information displayed in the command (it will be at the bottom underneath the word “Device”)Next you need to unmount the drive by running this:
    Code:
    umount /dev/xxxy
    Replace “xxx” with the disk name and “y” with the partition number.Time to do the actual formatting. Run this:
    Code:
    mkntfs -vv /dev/xxxy
    Replace “xxx” with the disk name and “y” with the partition number. NOTE: You can add the "--fast" option, which will make it not do the zeroing or the bad sector check. This will greatly speed up the formatting, but you could possibly cause a few issues in the future.[/spoiler][/SPOILER]
    [SPOILER=Chapter 2 - Loading your games to your hard drive] [SPOILER=Copying your original discs to your hard drive with your usb loader] CFG Usb loader
    1) Start your loader
    2) Insert your Wii game
    3) Go to the main tab
    4) Then go to install and you are done.

    Wiiflow

    1) Start your loader
    2) Insert your Wii game
    3) Go to the settings tab
    4) Navigate to the install tab and you are done.

    Usb loader GX

    1) Start your loader
    2) Insert your Wii game
    3) The loader will ask if you want to rip the game
    4) Press yes and you are done.[/SPOILER]
    [SPOILER=Transferring games from your Windows PC to your hard drive]Again for the purpose of the guide we will be converting the .iso files to .wbfs as it saves space but this is not a necessary step and it can remain as .iso if u wish.
    [SPOILER=Option 1 - Wii Game Manager] Get Wii game manager here
    1) Create a folder on the root of your hard drive called WBFS

    2) Load up Wii game manager:
    3) Go to open - open .iso files (List A)

    4) Navigate to where your .iso files are
    5) Right click on the game title and click 'create .wbfs File(s) With Subdirectories - No Split (if u decided to leave them in .iso format u would select copy to... (Create Subdirectories))

    6) A pop up box will appear and you need to navigate to your WBFS folder that you created on your Hard drive and press ok:
    The game will be installed to that directory[/SPOILER]
    [SPOILER=Option 2 - Wii Backup Manager] Get Wii Backup Manager here
    1) Create a folder on the root of your hard drive called WBFS

    2) Load up Wii Backup Manager
    3) Go to the Add tab

    4) Select file and navigate to where your .iso file is located
    5) Tick the box next to the game:
    6) Select the Transfer tab and then WBFS from the drop down menu

    7) A pop up box will appear and you need to navigate to your WBFS folder that you created on your Hard drive and press ok:
    The game will be installed to that directory[/SPOILER]
    [SPOILER=Option 3 - Wii Backup Fusion - windows 32bit] Get Wii Backup Fusion here
    1) Create a folder on the root of your hard drive called WBFS

    2) Load up Wii Backup Fusion
    3) Select the load tab in the bottom left corner

    4) navigate to where your .iso file is located
    5) Click on the game then go to the transfer to image tab

    6) Change the directory to your WBFS folder on your hard drive

    7) Make sure the image format is Wii Backup File System Container (*.wbfs)

    8) Click ok
    The game will be installed to that directory[/SPOILER][/SPOILER]
    [SPOILER=Linux and MAC users] [SPOILER=Linux - Wii Backup Fusion] Get Wii backup Fusion here and then follow option 3 from 'Transferring games from your Windows PC to your hard drive'

    Successfully tested on:
    - Linux: Ubuntu 11.04 'Natty Narwhal
    - Linux: Mint 11
    **for GNU/Linux does not seem work with Kubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot [/SPOILER]
    [SPOILER=Mac]NOTE: No Backup Manager that I've found for Mac worked 100% of the time, but here are a few options in the event one fails, you can try the other.[SPOILER=Option 1 - WiiJManager]Get WiiJManager 0.8, included in the bundle of files found here.
    1) Extract the WiiJManager folder from the downloaded .zip to your desktop or any other location of your choosing where you will be able to find it in the future. Since this is a java program, it is unable to be kept in your dock like normal Mac apps.

    2) Create a folder on the root of your hard drive called WBFS

    3) Execute WiiJManager by double clicking on the "WiiJManager.jar" file inside the extracted directory.

    4) You will now see two panels (named 1 and 2). In the pull-down in Panel 1, choose “Select Folder…” and find the directory that you have your .iso files in. You should then see any .iso or .wbfs files that exist in that directory shown in Panel 1.

    5) In the pull-down in Panel 2, choose “Select Folder…” and instead click on the NTFS-formatted device in the left, then choose the "WBFS" directory. If you did that correctly, you should see the location of Panel 2 to be: /Volumes/WiiHD/wbfs (replacing WiiHD with whatever you named your hard drive).

    6) Back to the list of games seen in Panel 1, select one of the games and you should then see the cover art for the selected game. Right click (or Control-Click if you have a single-button mouse) the selected game and choose “To Panel 2 -> Copy to WBFS”. You will see a progress bar with an ETA timer counting down to completion. When done, unmounts the NTFS drive properly, connect it to your Wii, and launch your USB Loader. This process is slow, a test run of this took about 90 minutes to do the install.

    7) Play your game.

    Successfully tested on:
    -Mac OS X: 10.6.8 Snow Leopard on a 32bit Intel-based Mac Mini
    -Mac OS X: 10.8.2 Mountain Lion on a 64bit Intel-based Mac Mini[/SPOILER]
    [SPOILER=Option 2 - Wii Backup Fusion] Get Wii backup Fusion here and then follow option 3 from 'Transferring games from your Windows PC to your hard drive'

    Successfully tested on:
    - Mac OS X: 10.5 Leopard (ppc)[/SPOILER][/SPOILER][/SPOILER][/SPOILER]
    [Spoiler=Credits]Bliepo - For The Linux Portion
    Brian - For the previous guide
    Mauifrog - For the softmod any wii guide
    Bmarlo - For the great banners
    Llaffer - For the information on Mac OS X
    dniMretsaM - for Linux command line alternative[/Spoiler]
    Last edited by llaffer; 02-27-2013 at 06:54 AM.

  2. #2
    Nice guide!

    But maybe a small reference at the beginning of it describing the main advantages/disadvantages of this file system would be nice. Or something like a NTFS vs FAT32 thing. What do you think?

    cheers

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by robertserrao View Post
    Nice guide!

    But maybe a small reference at the beginning of it describing the main advantages/disadvantages of this file system would be nice. Or something like a NTFS vs FAT32 thing. What do you think?

    cheers
    Maybe if i get some spare time i will add a spoiler, thanks for the suggestion

  4. #4
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    I think I wrote something similar to that in one of the threads a few days ago. If that can be found, it would be a place to start.

    EDIT: Found it! http://www.wiihacks.com/recommended-...tml#post687669
    Last edited by llaffer; 01-31-2013 at 08:21 AM.
    [spoiler=Click Below for recommended Links]
    Guides:

    Download the latest:
    Latest Loaders CFG v70r65
    GX r1226
    WiiFlow 4.2.1
    Other downloads DM/DML 2.11
    [/spoiler]

  5. #5
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    Feel free to add it mate, i have already started in the getting started spoiler

  6. #6
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    Nice work mate.



  7. #7
    I followed the guide to the letter my wii does see the hdd but not the games i put on there

  8. #8
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    How are u transferring the games? and are u sure u have the correct file structure? U must have a folder named WBFS on the root of the drive

  9. #9
    I use wii game manager and i have a wbfs folder on the drive

  10. #10
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    and the drive is marked as active and primary? and the loader is set to ntfs?

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