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Thread: Wii sd card question.....

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    Question Wii sd card question.....

    iv been modding wiis for a while now, and always using sandisc 2gb as suggested. im wondering after the modding prosses is done with , can I put in a 8gb or higher sd card and run apps, emulators, usb loaders off ? thanks in advance for the replys, cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by boob4me View Post
    iv been modding wiis for a while now, and always using sandisc 2gb as suggested. im wondering after the modding prosses is done with , can I put in a 8gb or higher sd card and run apps, emulators, usb loaders off ? thanks in advance for the replys, cheers
    After the mod is complete, most SD/SDHC cards will work just fine.
    SM 4.1 (v499) - BootMii/IOS v1.5 - HBC 1.1.2 - Priiloader 0.8b6 - d2x v9(r49) - WiiFlow 4.1.1
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  3. #3
    Good Question, I was wondering the same thing. Are high speed SD cards still not working in a Wii? Also is a 1GB SD too small?

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    Exclamation 8gb sdhc card working.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tashier View Post
    Good Question, I was wondering the same thing. Are high speed SD cards still not working in a Wii? Also is a 1GB SD too small?
    well, I got myself a 8gb sandisc sdhc 4 model whatever that means...lol transferd all my data from my 2gb and all seems to be working great, kept all my data backed up on my pc just in case
    a 1gb will work just fine for the mod

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    The class of the Sd card is in reference to the speed in which it can read/write to the device.

    [spoiler=]
    The speed rating measures maximum transfer speed for writing and reading images to and from the card, expressed as megabytes per second. However, video doesn't need as big a pipe because the video format is a smaller "fixed stream" that uses only a portion of the pipe.

    Unlike card write speeds that measure maximum performance, class ratings measure the minimum sustained speed required for recording an even rate of video onto the card. The class rating number corresponds to the transfer rate measured in megabytes per second. Class 2 cards are designed for a minimum sustained transfer rate of 2 megabytes per second (MB/s)1, while Class 10 cards are designed for a minimum sustained transfer rate of 10MB/s2.

    What does this difference mean for me?

    Rated Speed (e.g. 15MB/s, 30MB/s, etc.) is maximum speed of the card and also what you would expect to approximately see in typical usage of writing or reading files on the card. This measurement is pertinent to still photography, especially for taking pictures with high resolution and/or saving in RAW format where the files created are very large. The faster the card, the faster it can save the file and be ready to take another picture. You really notice speed differences with high-megapixel DSLR and multi-shot burst mode.

    Still digital images shot on high-megapixel cameras should utilize fast data throughput (a large pipe), higher speed cards for improved performance. Higher speed cards can also improve how fast you can download (or upload) the files from the card to your computer.

    Speed Class is a minimum speed based on a worst case scenario test. The Speed Class is important for video mode or camcorders, where the device is actually saving a steady stream of data. The resolution and format of the video determines the amount of steady stream data. This translates to a minimum speed you need to guarantee that the video captured on the cards is recorded at an even, sustained rate with no dropped frames (which typically results in lost data and choppy playback).

    Compared to high-megapixel photography, video doesn't need as big a pipe because the video format is a smaller "fixed stream" that uses only a portion of the pipe. But you do need a minimum guaranteed speed for the SDHC card that satisfies the requirement of the data stream. Your camera's specifications should state the minimum SDHC Class Rating required.

    Using a card without the proper class rating on a more advanced camera, such as a high-definition (HD) camcorder or Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera with HD video record settings is likely to result in an error message indicating that video can only be recorded at a lower definition setting.

    Source

    [/spoiler]

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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by Jax View Post
    The class of the Sd card is in reference to the speed in which it can read/write to the device.

    [spoiler=]
    The speed rating measures maximum transfer speed for writing and reading images to and from the card, expressed as megabytes per second. However, video doesn't need as big a pipe because the video format is a smaller "fixed stream" that uses only a portion of the pipe.

    Unlike card write speeds that measure maximum performance, class ratings measure the minimum sustained speed required for recording an even rate of video onto the card. The class rating number corresponds to the transfer rate measured in megabytes per second. Class 2 cards are designed for a minimum sustained transfer rate of 2 megabytes per second (MB/s)1, while Class 10 cards are designed for a minimum sustained transfer rate of 10MB/s2.

    What does this difference mean for me?

    Rated Speed (e.g. 15MB/s, 30MB/s, etc.) is maximum speed of the card and also what you would expect to approximately see in typical usage of writing or reading files on the card. This measurement is pertinent to still photography, especially for taking pictures with high resolution and/or saving in RAW format where the files created are very large. The faster the card, the faster it can save the file and be ready to take another picture. You really notice speed differences with high-megapixel DSLR and multi-shot burst mode.

    Still digital images shot on high-megapixel cameras should utilize fast data throughput (a large pipe), higher speed cards for improved performance. Higher speed cards can also improve how fast you can download (or upload) the files from the card to your computer.

    Speed Class is a minimum speed based on a worst case scenario test. The Speed Class is important for video mode or camcorders, where the device is actually saving a steady stream of data. The resolution and format of the video determines the amount of steady stream data. This translates to a minimum speed you need to guarantee that the video captured on the cards is recorded at an even, sustained rate with no dropped frames (which typically results in lost data and choppy playback).

    Compared to high-megapixel photography, video doesn't need as big a pipe because the video format is a smaller "fixed stream" that uses only a portion of the pipe. But you do need a minimum guaranteed speed for the SDHC card that satisfies the requirement of the data stream. Your camera's specifications should state the minimum SDHC Class Rating required.

    Using a card without the proper class rating on a more advanced camera, such as a high-definition (HD) camcorder or Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera with HD video record settings is likely to result in an error message indicating that video can only be recorded at a lower definition setting.

    Source

    [/spoiler]
    and now I know... cheers, I guess I learned something today...

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