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Thread: How to format with 32kb clusters on a Mac?

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    Question How to format with 32kb clusters on a Mac?

    I did some googling, and it seems like it's pretty simple on Windows because there are a plethora of third party disk partition programs to use.
    The only thing I could find on how to do it on a mac involves using the terminal, and I have zero experience with the Terminal. If that is the only way to do it, would it be a huge pain to ask for a detailed step-by-step on exactly how to do it?


    EDIT: I solved it! I asked on an OS X forum, and someone gave me a detailed response, that I have pasted below!

    I figured it out! I don't know how to tell everyone this, but I asked on an OS X forum, and got a very detailed explanation of how to do it on a mac!



    1. Open Disk Utility. Find the disk in the list that you want to format, control-click and select "Information". You're looking for the "Disk Identifier," which should be something like disk1, disk2, disk3 etc. close disk utility.

    2. Now open Terminal and type (without quotes) "
    fdisk -e /dev/XXXX" (where XXX is the disk name and number you got from step one.)

    3. Type
    (without quotes) "auto dos" to create one big FAT32 partition.

    4. Now you type
    (without quotes) "write" and then (without quotes) "quit" to save the new partition table.

    5. Now your cluster size. Type
    (without quotes)"newfs_msdos -F 32 -c 32 -v "DiskName" /dev/XXXXs1" where XXXX is the disk name and number you got in step one.

    This will format the drive as FAT32. Check if the volume is mounted. If it isn't, open Disk Utility, select "DiskName" and choose File -> Mount."
    Last edited by jezwald; 07-12-2014 at 02:39 AM.

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    I've actually spent quite a bit of time trying to figure that one out, without success.

    You may have to find a buddy with a Windows machine that will let you install EaseUs on their machine long enough for you to format your drive.

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    If I really have to, I will install windows bootcamp on this machine just so I can format the disk and then uninstall it again, but I assumed that if it could be done in Terminal that there would be a program that does the same thing with some kind of GUI for the less technical folks out there.

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    Probably. I messed around with the format command last year trying to figure it out, but never could get it to work. I may research it and try again , but for now, bootcamp may be your best option.

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    Gah, alright then. Do you have any experience with Parallels? If it can be done with a VM Windows instead of a boot camped windows I would be very happy. I don't see why it couldn't, but I don't know if Parallels restricts access to that kind of thing or not.


    Thanks for the input!

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    Never heard of it. Sorry.

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    I figured it out! I don't know how to tell everyone this, but I asked on an OS X forum, and got a very detailed explanation of how to do it on a mac!



    1. Open Disk Utility. Find the disk in the list that you want to format, control-click and select "Information". You're looking for the "Disk Identifier," which should be something like disk1, disk2, disk3 etc. close disk utility.

    2. Now open Terminal and type (without quotes) "
    fdisk -e /dev/XXXX" (where XXX is the disk name and number you got from step one.)

    3. Type
    (without quotes) "auto dos" to create one big FAT32 partition.

    4. Now you type
    (without quotes) "write" and then (without quotes) "quit" to save the new partition table.

    5. Now your cluster size. Type
    (without quotes)"newfs_msdos -F 32 -c 32 -v "DiskName" /dev/XXXXs1" where XXXX is the disk name and number you got in step one.

    This will format the drive as FAT32. Check if the volume is mounted. If it isn't, open Disk Utility, select "DiskName" and choose File -> Mount."

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    Thanks. I'll test this information out on one of my spare drives for validation. If it works for me, I'll add it to the guide.

    EDIT: I tested the steps, and ended up with a FAT32 with 16k cluster partition. I'll see if I can tweak the settings a little to get it to work, once I figure out what those arguments in the newfs_msdos command means.

    EDIT2: I changed the argument to "-c 64" and then it formatted it as 32k clusters. (During the format, you are told what the bytes per cluster is after sending the command, such as this one:

    Code:
    Eve:~ llaffer$ sudo newfs_msdos -F 32 -c 64 -v "Wii Disk" /dev/disk2s1
    newfs_msdos: warning: /dev/disk2d1 is not a character device
    512 bytes per physical sector
    /dev/disk2d1: 1952978880 sectors in 30515295 FAT32 clusters (32768 bytes/cluster)
    bps=512 spc=64 res=32 nft=2 mid=0xf8 spt=32 hds=255 hid=63 drv=0x80 bsec=1953455742 bspf=238401 rdcl=2 infs=1 bkbs=6
    Eve:~ llaffer$
    You are shown the bytes per cluster in the middle-ish line. Can you verify that you do see 32768 when "-c 32" or "-c 64" is used in your system, so we can see if things are the same between us, or if they can vary (likely based on the size of the hard drive, I'm using a 1TB drive, what are you using?)
    Last edited by llaffer; 07-12-2014 at 08:49 AM.

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