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Thread: overused/scratched game disc

  1. #11
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    Total Disc Repair | CD Repair Machines and CD Repair Service for professionals

    These things don't come cheap. I paid 1200 Queen Quids for a refurb, they cost 1800 Queens new. They are marketed towards games/video shops, which is what I have. They do do a smaller unit for private users but it is still going to be uneconomical to own, unless you can repair discs for people you know and make some money from it. Disc repair is also available on ebay, I saw an advert a while back. You post your discs, and they come back scratch free! Well worth doing if you have scratched originals worth $$$ that don't work.

  2. #12
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    Do YOU offer such a service? I would mail u my disc..

  3. #13
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    I'm not offering this service at the moment. I will probably start offering the service soon on ebay. For now, I have found you these people who do offer the disc repair service.

    USA/Canada A

    Europe B

    There are several people offering this service on ebay so check them all out.

  4. #14
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    I have repaired several discs. Often, some Pledge furniture polish and soft cloth will take care of it. The wax seems to fill in the minor scratches.

    However, I had a GC disc that just wouldn't work anymore, so I literally sanded the disc with 500 grit sand paper, used some automotive car compound, then finished with a coat of car wax, and it has worked flawlessly ever since.

    I think the key is to get rid of those heavier scratches which could distort the laser reading the info off the disc....my assumption as I am no techie.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by luck11 View Post

    However, I had a GC disc that just wouldn't work anymore, so I literally sanded the disc with 500 grit sand paper, used some automotive car compound, then finished with a coat of car wax, and it has worked flawlessly ever since.

    .
    LMFAO ......shocking you didn't prime it lol

  6. #16
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    What automotive car compound did you use? I also have 500 grit sand paper and some primer and white paint.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vanylapep View Post
    What automotive car compound did you use? I also have 500 grit sand paper and some primer and white paint.
    Wait.......this is not a nintendo forum? It sounding like a autobody shop forum. we will call this "rad games by troy" (LMFAO)

  8. #18
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    No but seriously lucky11 it is not a wise idea to sand down a disc cause it can distort the layers on the disc followed by the material that the data is on.

  9. #19
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    Primer? Hmmmm...the wheels are turning...

    Seriously though, I tried only because I figured I had nothing to lose. I don't think I would do that on a disc which is intermittently not working. Pledge usually works wonders, and others I have repaired with just some rubbing compound and some wax.

    In this case, I just used what I had lying around, with ultimate objective of getting some of the grooves out then polishing the surface again. Took me less than 5 minutes, and my son was happier than a pig in $%!@ because it was his favorite game.

    I sanded very lightly, and 500 grit keeps it fairly smooth, with rubbing compound taking care of the rest. Just to clarify, I have only done this once, so I cannot say for sure whether this was just pure luck, or the sanding actually did the trick.

    I saw another post about toothpaste...that would function, more or less, like a rubbing compound for those of you who want to give it a try.

    All that said, I ALWAYS try the least abrasive option first....ie.some sort (automotive, pledge whatever) first. IF that doesn't work, then I try using some rubbing compound followed by wax. This has always worked (except once of course).

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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by luck11 View Post
    Primer? Hmmmm...the wheels are turning...
    All that said, I ALWAYS try the least abrasive option first....ie.some sort (automotive, pledge whatever) first. IF that doesn't work, then I try using some rubbing compound followed by wax. This has always worked (except once of course).
    ok......cool but but just as i always said be very very cautious in doing the "sandpaper fix"
    But one question? Did you dry sand the disc or wet sand?

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