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Thread: Wii fuse might have BLOWN!!!

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    Unhappy Wii fuse might have BLOWN!!!

    Hello i have a wii which won't even give me the red light to say that there is electricity coming thorugh i think its blown fuse which i could easily replace from the plug is this right i tried to use other desperate options from mauifrogs page but unfortunately that did'nt work.help would be lovely

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    New Member Fred-Bear's Avatar
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    Before opening up the power supply, grab yourself a multi-use voltage tester (You can find cheap testers at most automotive stores) and see if you are getting 12 volts DC from the end of the plug that goes into the Wii. If not... then the PSU can come into suspect. If you do, than you have other issues than the PSU.

    If you do not have the 12VDC, then you will have to open up the PSU (which uses special screws and may require some "special" attention) and check for continuity (ohms) across the two pins (on the underside of the PCB) on the fuse to see if it is blown or not. The fuse is a black rectangular object located at the incoming (cord that plugs into wall) end of the PSU. If it shows no continuity than you will have to unsolder and replace the fuse. Needless to say, make sure the PSU is not plugged in when you do this.

    Although I do not recommend this, I have known people that have just soldered a jumper wire across the two points. This of course bypasses any protection... and posses great risk to further damage to the Wii or your personal health. The fuse is there for a reason, and blew for a reason.
    ~

    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways - Bottle of Jack Daniels in one hand - Cigarette in the other - body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming, "WOO HOO, What a Ride!"
    ~

    Use the at the bottom right of the post if this response was of any assistance.

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    Im not sure what the person above is talking about...

    Try another psu, if it still doesnt power up you could have blown the fuse in the console.

    If it does work, buy a new power supply.

    Dont bother messing about opening the psu


    Sent from somewhere other than a PC

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    New Member Fred-Bear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad_Ad84 View Post
    Im not sure what the person above is talking about...
    I will help you out then.

    By using a volt meter as mentioned above you can see if the PSU is outputting 12 VDC (Volts Direct Current) Similiar to what a car battery puts out. By doing this, the person can determine if his PSU is good or not. Using this method would save him/her from having to either incurr the cost of a new PSU or the hassle of borrowing one.

    The fuse in the external plug PSU is easy to replace and has somewhat of a history of failing. As stated by the person,
    Quote Originally Posted by mizzeeboy View Post
    i think its blown fuse which i could easily replace from the plug
    he/she feels like he has the ability to do this type of repair.

    If its not this fuse.... then there are other possibilities. As you mentioned, there are the internal board mounted fuses. Not only do these fuses very seldom blow, they require dismantling the Wii console... as well as a more advanced skill set to replace.
    ~

    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways - Bottle of Jack Daniels in one hand - Cigarette in the other - body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming, "WOO HOO, What a Ride!"
    ~

    Use the at the bottom right of the post if this response was of any assistance.

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    attached is the psu module, showing the fuse. yet, i never suggest 4u to open and repair it. buy a new one !!!
    the SMD fuse on mobo is just next to the DC input plug. i don't think it could be opened in normal use.

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    New Member Fred-Bear's Avatar
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    And just to cover all of the bases... in case you have not done this... there is an additional resettable protection circuit within the AC adapter... By unplugging the adapter from the wall... and waiting 5 minutes or so... if tripped... it will reset itself.
    ~

    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways - Bottle of Jack Daniels in one hand - Cigarette in the other - body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming, "WOO HOO, What a Ride!"
    ~

    Use the at the bottom right of the post if this response was of any assistance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred-Bear View Post
    And just to cover all of the bases... in case you have not done this... there is an additional resettable protection circuit within the AC adapter... By unplugging the adapter from the wall... and waiting 5 minutes or so... if tripped... it will reset itself.
    This is the more likely problem. Happened to me before.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred-Bear View Post
    I will help you out then.

    By using a volt meter as mentioned above you can see if the PSU is outputting 12 VDC (Volts Direct Current) Similiar to what a car battery puts out. By doing this, the person can determine if his PSU is good or not. Using this method would save him/her from having to either incurr the cost of a new PSU or the hassle of borrowing one.

    The fuse in the external plug PSU is easy to replace and has somewhat of a history of failing. As stated by the person, he/she feels like he has the ability to do this type of repair.

    If its not this fuse.... then there are other possibilities. As you mentioned, there are the internal board mounted fuses. Not only do these fuses very seldom blow, they require dismantling the Wii console... as well as a more advanced skill set to replace.

    Im well aware of the testing procedure. I just think you are extremely reckless for telling someone to open and repair a PSU on a forum.

    Also the internal fuse blows more often than you think - i've repaired hundreds and hundreds of Wiis.


    Basically my point is, don't suggest to people to open and repair a PSU that is connected to the mains. If someone is capable of doing the repair, they wouldnt be asking. What you are doing is creating a fire risk and its extremely irresponsible. Especially as new ones cost like $10 (which is the same sort of price as a meter you suggested buying in the first place).

    Long story short, the OP shouldnt follow your advice.
    Last edited by Bad_Ad84; 04-25-2011 at 03:49 AM.

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    New Member Fred-Bear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad_Ad84 View Post
    I just think you are extremely reckless for telling someone to open and repair a PSU to someone on a forum.
    Note the following comment The person indicates that this type of repair is wthin his grasp.
    Quote Originally Posted by mizzeeboy View Post
    which i could easily replace from the plug
    The individual asked for methods to repair his Wii. The answer given was a method done quite often by many Wii owners. It takes less effort to replace this fuse then replacing say a drive spindle or mobo fuses or any of the other components in a Wii. Tossing a "fear factor" out there because its the PSU is good to note.... But like any repair or mod done to the Wii... if done properly, there should be no problems.
    ~

    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways - Bottle of Jack Daniels in one hand - Cigarette in the other - body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming, "WOO HOO, What a Ride!"
    ~

    Use the at the bottom right of the post if this response was of any assistance.

  10. #10
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    Replacing the fuse in the plug isnt what my comments were about.

    It was the
    If you do not have the 12VDC, then you will have to open up the PSU (which uses special screws and may require some "special" attention) and check for continuity (ohms) across the two pins (on the underside of the PCB) on the fuse to see if it is blown or not. The fuse is a black rectangular object located at the incoming (cord that plugs into wall) end of the PSU. If it shows no continuity than you will have to unsolder and replace the fuse. Needless to say, make sure the PSU is not plugged in when you do this.

    Although I do not recommend this, I have known people that have just soldered a jumper wire across the two points. This of course bypasses any protection... and posses great risk to further damage to the Wii or your personal health. The fuse is there for a reason, and blew for a reason.
    You basically told him something that could cause a fire, and would involve him buying tools that cost the same as just buying a replacement PSU.... so as I said above, extremely reckless for no good reason.

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