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Thread: Help! Wii locked up, and now bricked?

  1. #11
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    I will double check, I have stuff alot better than a homemade pic programmer

    Where did he get a working dump from? or did he just dump another one? If this works, Ill post a working dump but its unlikely to be cost effective unless you already have a programmer.

  2. #12
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    I guess that he originally dumped code from a known good module. However, he now had this on file, and just programmed mine from his disc file.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bad_Ad84 View Post
    If this works ....
    Well, it most certainly can work. I know that I've got my original module back, and my Wii, which once was dead, now is alive.
    Last edited by PeteBell; 07-07-2010 at 07:02 AM.

  3. #13
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    Ok, my results so far:

    The chip isnt labelled correctly (they sometimes do this to throw you off what part it is).

    From checking all the microchip datasheets, theres only 1 chip that matches the pinout and its 24AA025E48 which is a mac address chip.
    datasheet here:
    http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/e...Doc/22124D.pdf

    It certainly makes sense if this chip is becoming corrupt that the module would fail. My external programmer will handle this chip, so once i have a broken bluetooth module come in, i will test reflashing it.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad_Ad84 View Post
    From checking all the microchip datasheets, theres only 1 chip that matches the pinout and its 24AA025E48 which is a mac address chip.
    Okay, that makes sense. So I'm probably now using a different mac on my bluetooth which would explain why I had to re-synch all my remotes. Is there a simple way of discovering what mac address is being used?

    Are all the address lines driven, or are they tied down (or up)? I guess that if the corruption affects the address bits internally, then this would prevent the chip from being selected. If the address lines are driven, then this suggests that there may be other devices on the same i2c bus. If they're tied, then it might be possible to revive a dead module just by altering the configuration of the address lines .. after all, there would only be eight combinations to try!

    From what I could see on-screen, not all 2kbits were being programmed.

    I was hoping that the fact I had to re-synch meant that the controller addresses were being stored in the chip ... which would mean that the chip would be writable in-circuit ... which would mean that someone who knows more about the Wii internals than I do could write some code to re-flash the chip without dismantling the Wii!

    I'm still wondering why the chip becomes corrupted - in my case, when the console crashed (hung up). Perhaps, the device is programmable in-circuit?

    It certainly makes sense if this chip is becoming corrupt that the module would fail. My external programmer will handle this chip, so once i have a broken bluetooth module come in, i will test reflashing it.
    Well, I will be very interested in what you find out!
    Last edited by PeteBell; 07-07-2010 at 03:17 PM.

  5. #15
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    There is only 2 data lines on the chip, its a serial chip.

    It must be internal data corruption, only fix would be to reprogram it. I dont think it would be possible to do this from the Wii... as the chip just looks like storage for the BCM bluetooth chip.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad_Ad84 View Post
    There is only 2 data lines on the chip, its a serial chip.
    Indeed, but there are three 'chip address' lines (on the SOIC package), allowing up to eight devices to be addressed on the I2C bus. What I was thinking was that if the internally stored 'slave address' becomes corrupted, then the device will never become active, perhaps causing the symptoms which we experience.

  7. #17
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    Not on this chip, this is the top one on the diagram 24AA02E48. pins 1-4 are all connected to ground.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad_Ad84 View Post
    ... theres only 1 chip that matches the pinout and its 24AA025E48
    Quote Originally Posted by Bad_Ad84 View Post
    this is the top one on the diagram 24AA02E48. pins 1-4 are all connected to ground.
    Ah, okay. From your earlier post, I was still thinking that it was the bottom one!

  9. #19
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    Typo, my mistake.

    But its the top one

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